The Boba Bounty

Your latest news and speculation on Boba Fett's presence in Star Wars film, television, comics, video games and collectibles. Also, the originator of the #BringBackBoba Campaign.

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About 16,000 participated in an online poll at IGN.com on who they most want to see return in Episode VII. The results were a near landslide, with Boba Fett receiving nearly a quarter of the votes. Twenty-three percent of the people polled voted for Boba Fett.

The best way to illustrate the scale of these results, the runner up was Darth Maul with 12 percent and Chewbacca with 11 percent. IGN.com included 20 characters in the poll, excluding “obvious” choices like Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Darth Vader.

Earlier this year, StarWars.com came up with similar results during their March Madness Character Tournament. If you take the same characters out, that IGN omitted, and you’d be left also with Boba Fett as the top choice – note, he did make the semi-finals during that tourney.

While I was excited to learn these results, the result articles made my teeth grind – the writer commenting that Boba Fett is dead, a fact we all know is false. Even if you’re only considering G-Level canon, you cannot conclude Boba died.

A rule of thumb for genre television and movies has always been – if you don’t see a body, you can’t know 100 percent they’re fate is sealed. That being said, this story has been making the rounds and I must imagine has come to the attention of Lucasfilm officials.

Let’s continue to cross our fingers that we’ll see the “resurrection” of Boba Fett in the sequel trilogy.

Last week we reported an alleged rumor that the sequel trilogy – and spin-off films by extension if developed around the same time period – will be inspired by stories from the Legacy Era. If this is true, there’s a strong possibility of seeing the debut of Mirta Gev.

In the novels, Mirta Gev is the granddaughter of Boba Fett. She plays a pivotal role in the character development of Boba Fett – she was essential in him fully embracing his position as Mandalore, is key in him finding a cure to his failing health and is helps him bring closure to the death of his father and separation from his wife. Both issues haunted Boba Fett for decades.

Mirta Gev’s inclusion in the sequel trilogy or spin-offs would also bring another strong female role to the Star Wars saga. There’s been an increase in female fans over the years, arguably thanks to the female characters introduced in The Clone Wars. Disney would surely want to secure its girl fanbase, and a tough character like Mirta Gev would be a ideal candidate for that goal.

This leaves the question – who could play Mirta Gev? I’d like to throw in my own two cents. I think the perfect actress to portray Mirta Gev is none other than Lacey Chabert – best known by the masses for her role in “Mean Girls.”

However, this actress has a lot more depth than seen in the prissy high school girl she played in that movie.

Chabert already has a number of connections to Star Wars and Lucasfilm crew.

In 2011, she provided the voice for Mako in the video game “Star Wars: The Old Republic.” She also has a working relationship with Greg Weisman, producer of the new “Rebels” cartoon, when she voiced a few episodes of “Gargoyles” in the 90’s and most recently in Weisman’s “Young Justice” and “The Spectacular Spider-Man.”  

In the latest issue of Geek Magazine, its writing team sat down with Steven Melching, writer of The Clone Wars, and Chris Gossett, Star Wars artist, to gain their insight into the popularity of Boba Fett. This Q&A was a sidebar to a larger feature, looking at the Saga’s standing in the fan community.

“After briefly being introduced in The Star Wars Holiday Special, bounty hunter Boba Fett made a more impressive entrance to the Star Wars mythos in The Empire Strikes Back, in which he instantly captivated the imaginations of fans everywhere. The character’s enduring popularity led to him being added into the original Star Wars in the 1997 Special Edition release and becoming a vital part of the prequels years later. So why has Boba Fett become such a fan favorite opposed to some of his brooding brethren, such as IG-88 and Bossk? We turned to our Star Wars experts to get their thoughts on Fett’s enduring Mandalorian appeal.” - Geek Magazine

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Melching accredited Boba Fett’s popularity to the mystique the character carried prior to the release of Empire. He believes the promotional action figure also endeared fans to the character – many impressed by his armor, specifically the fact he was rumored to have taken down Wookiees – even wearing a braid of his Wookiee targets over his gear.

“I think a big reason why Fett became so popular was because we really didn’t know a whole lot about him. He was described as a Mandalorian Shock Trooper. Who the hell were they?” Melching said. “Did they fight in the Clone Wars? Could he be this ‘other’ that Yoda spoke of? All this anticipation made his ignominious demise in Return of the Jedi all the more crushing.”

Gossett chimed in, saying the prequels screwed up the character in his opinion. Making Boba Fett a clone was one of the major problems in the prequels, he said. Gossett believes one of the characteristics beloved about Fett was he was Han Solo without a soul – Boba Fett was what Solo might have become if he made different choices as a smuggler.

“Showing that contrast was one of the functions Boba Fett served, and he served it damn well. The fact that Lucas just dropped him into the Sarlacc Pit was a sign of poor choices to come,” Gossett said.

According to Melching, the main protagonist of Episode VI was supposed to be Boba Fett. The Sarlacc was a quick solution when George Lucas decided to squash Episode VII-IX into Return of the Jedi – which was supposed to feature Han Solo versus Boba Fett, with the Skywalker story only introduced at the end leading to the next trilogy.

“Fans still refuse to accept that he died in the Sarlacc Pit… He became a major player in the Clone Wars series, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he turns up in Episode VII or as a central character in one of the rumored ‘spin-off’ movies,” Melching said.

 

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There’s been speculation whether or not the Star Wars spin-off films will be related to the series proper. If the latest plot rumors have a kernel of truth, as reported by SchmoesKnow.com, this very well may be.

According to the “leaked” information, the plot centering on Episode VII will involve the characters of Jaina and Jacen Solo – the twin children of Han Solo and Leia Organa. The New Jedi Order has been established, but tensions rise when Jacen turns to the Dark Side.

Fans of the Expanded Universe are familiar with this story, especially from the “Legacy of the Force” novels. Jaina was trained by Luke Skywalker and her brother, Jacen, becomes one of the most powerful Jedi in the universe, rivaling Luke, himself.

In the novels, Jacen is seduced to the Dark Side as a way to better the world. He becomes convinced he can learn this side of the Force without falling into the same trappings his grandfather, Anakin, had. In the novels, it becomes left to Jaina to stop her brother – and to do so, she seeks out Boba Fett to train her.

Jaina’s time spent on Mandalore, training with Fett, becoming comrades with Mirta Gev, Boba Fett’s granddaughter, and fighting beside Mandalorians, was a pivotal piece of her readying to take down her brother.

Therefore, if the plot of Episode VII is truly about the Solo twins – we’ll likely see a heavy amount of Mandalorians – even if this isn’t fleshed out until Episode VIII or IX.

I wouldn’t be shocked if Disney wants to include more Mandalorians in the sequel trilogy. The popularity of Death Watch and Mandalore-centered episodes in The Clone Wars has proven fans embrace Mandalorian factions as much as Jedi and Sith.

This also would open Boba Fett’s rumored spin-off, especially if Episode VIII is when they land Jaina on Mandalore.

They could set up the fall of Jacen in Episode VII, and then release the Boba Fett spin-off, which centers on Boba Fett’s survival from the Sarlacc, reunion with Mirta Gev and becoming Mandalore.

Then we have all the information we need to lead into Episode VIII – which shows Jaina arriving on Mandalore and her experiences with the people.

What are your thoughts?

Boba Fett is NOT dead.

After Disney announced its acquisition of Lucasfilm, speculation and rumors flew across the Internet. What continues to get under my skin is the notion from journalist and bloggers that Boba Fett died in the stomach of the Sarlacc.

Those who are familiar with the Expanded Universe, and recent interviews with George Lucas, know Boba Fett is far from dead.

The question remains though: who should be cast as Boba Fett in upcoming Star Wars sequels? I’ve come up with three likely suspects.

Jeremy Bulloch - The Original Man Behind the Mask

Jeremy Bulloch brought a subtle nuance to his portrayal of Boba Fett, which endeared the bounty hunter to audiences worldwide. The way he cradled his blaster while standing on the command deck of the Death Star; the slightest nod awarded to a disguised Leia in Jabba’s Palace; or his commanding presence in Cloud City are examples of how Bulloch used body language to define his character.

The fact that Bulloch is approach age 65 doesn’t necessarily mean he cannot suit up for the sequel trilogy. In a recent interview, Bulloch expressed his willingness to pick up his role as Boba Fett for Episode VII. He said he remains spry, and because Boba Fett wears a helmet, the more action oriented scenes could easily be performed by a stunt man – as they were in the original trilogy.

Boba Fett is a walking arsenal. It’s easy for an actor to appear stiff underneath all that armor and heavy clothes, but Bulloch has the chops to emote from underneath all those layers. There’s one problem though – Boba Fett is a clone of his father, Jango Fett – who we’ve seen unmasked in Attack of the Clones. Therefore, the film would be handicapped by having to explain how Boba Fett grew to look nothing like the template he was created from in Episode II.

Daniel Logan - Not Like Other Clones

We were introduced to Daniel Logan when he played the child Boba Fett in Attack of the Clones. It was good casting, because he carried a familial resemblance to his one screen father, Temuera Morrison. When Lucasfilm launched The Clone Wars, they brought Logan on to continue his role as young Boba Fett when appeared during the last story arch of the second season.

Over the last decade, Logan has grown a strong fan base of younger Star Wars fans and owns the role in that right. He is the Jeremy Bulloch of what I like to call, “the clone generation.” Logan’s involvement with Episode VII would keep continuity with George Lucas’ revised vision of the Star Wars Universe.

The problem arises in this casting choice because Logan is twentysomething, making him too young to appear in a film that assuming takes place years after Return of the Jedi. The filmmakers could parry this by saying his DNA was altered to slow aging, in contrast to Clone Troopers, whose aging was sped up. However, that seems too convenient.

Temuera Morrison - From Jango to Boba?

Ironically, the actor I feel is best to play Boba Fett in upcoming movies is none other than Temuera Morrison. This New Zealand-born actor first wore the Mandalorian armor in Attack of the Clones and for the first time on screen, we got to see the full capabilities of its weapons inventory.

Morrison gave a great performance in Attack of the Clones and was the highlight of the prequel trilogy for me – yeah, I’m biased. He made the character of Jango Fett his own and his performance earned continuing storylines from Mandalorian space in comics, books and television.

I believe Morrison would be a great casting choice because of several reasons. Being an unaltered clone of his father, you can only conclude Boba Fett would grow to look exactly like Jango Fett. Also, his age would seem more appropriate for the era the sequel trilogy will most likely take place in. The actor could actually remove his helmet in the film without a retcon being applied.