The Boba Bounty

Your latest news and speculation on Boba Fett's presence in Star Wars film, television, comics, video games and collectibles. Also, the originator of the #BringBackBoba Campaign.

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My wife and I have a busy day tomorrow, so we celebrated our gift giving earlier tonight. I received a nice bounty of Boba Fett merchandise for my collection including, a Titanium Series Diecast Slave I, Boba Fett Pez Dispenser, LEGO Star Wars The Complete Saga for Wii, and Agents of Empire: Hard Targets and Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin trade paperbacks. Several of these items I’ve been hunting for a while, and was thrilled to finally own them! Did you receive any Boba Fett items for Christmas? Comment and share your bounties below!

Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars” #9.

We’re now nine issues deep into the first story arc of Dark Horse’s “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin.” The story by Brian Wood is superb and continues to capture the spirit of the Original Trilogy, the art is stunning every issue and the book keeps a swift pace – however, I feel this is a story better read in trade paperback.

Having to wait a month between each issue is frustrating, because Wood checks in with each subplot every time. While it’s nice to provide face time to each fan favorite, it’s like watching three minutes of a movie each day – sure, we’ll get to the peak of drama eventually, but its sure taking a while to get there. Each week I keep hoping the next issue is where all the subplots will meet for a giant payoff.

In “Star Wars” #9, Luke Skywalker and Wedge Atilles escape custody and are maneuvering toward the data core to bug the communication system. We get a tie in to The Clone Wars, with Princess Leia receiving contact by the Audacity, a ship from the wartime era. The most staggered storyline, though, continues to be Boba Fett and Han Solo.

At the end of Issue #8, a long-awaiting gunfight was teased between the smuggler and bounty hunter. Promotional images further promised an engaging encounter, as we saw images of Boba Fett ejecting from Slave I to pursue Han Solo face-to-face.

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The dialogue written for Boba Fett is great, stating that Jabba pays more for his bounties to be turned in whole, rather than blown to smithereens. However, we’re denied a decent gunfight, as Perla crashes a platform, quickly evading the bounty hunter. Also, we see Bossk hot on the tail of the Falcon, being piloted by Chewbacca.

In the previous issue, there was a passing comment about bounty hunters not usually crossing into Imperial compounds or stations. Unless we see it in the forthcoming issue, I think this was a missed opportunity. All the chaos and destruction and Imperial agents aren’t swarming onto scene?

Woods could have had Imperial Troopers arrive on scene, and that, in my opinion, could have been a better distraction to allow Perla and Solo to escape. Also, more chances to show Boba Fett in action. Once again, we continue to watch the cat-and-mouse game between the two men – which I continue to have faith will result in a payoff in the end.

"Star Wars" #10 will be available Oct. 9.

The last time we saw Boba Fett he had tracked the Millennium Falcon to a far reach of space, where Han Solo and Chewbacca were hiding within space debris for a rendezvous. The smuggler got away, but Boba Fett has now tracked Solo back to the planet Coruscant – and he’s not alone – the Mandalorian has allied himself with the bounty hunter, Bossk.

I’ve been wondering when writer Brian Wood would check back in with the bounty hunter. In “Star Wars” #5, we finally catch up with this subplot – but it leaves us with more questions than answers. Han Solo has come to Coruscant to obtain forged identification papers, but he and Chewbacca must run for it when they realize they’re being followed.

Boba Fett is torn between the two bounties which have been placed on the smuggler – the original bounty placed by Jabba the Hutt, and the latter by Darth Vader who specifically wants to get his hands on the Falcon. It’s while juggling his options that he loses track of Han Solo.

The Corellian managed to escape the grasp of Boba Fett and Bossk by accepting a proposition of an Imperial Sanitation Officer named Perla. She is aware of the high bounty placed on Solo’s head, a smuggler herself, she capitalizes on Solo’s predicament by offering him a getaway for 10 percent of the bounty reward.

There are a few things to note about this issue: the first is Wood seems to have adopted the retconned relationship between Boba and Bossk – mainly that they have a working relationship that seems (thus far) friendly.

Is this acknowledgment of the history of partnership we saw in The Clone Wars or the shaky partnership forged in the Bounty Hunter Wars trilogy of books?

I continue to hope Wood has plans to devote an entire issue to the Boba Fett/Han Solo plot line, rather than giving a few panels to this story every few issues. I also hope he further fleshes out the partnership between Boba Fett and Bossk.

It should also be noted the illustration of Bossk is more similar to his tall and lanky appearance in The Clone Wars than depictions of him in comics and novels prior to any recon stories.

There’s no hints as to whether or not Boba Fett will appear in “Star Wars” #6, but as the story arc concludes – I can only imagine Wood plans to tie up this subplot – meaning chances are strong we won’t have to wait so long for another appearance by the Mandalorian.

It only took 24 hours for Dark Horse’s new series, “Star Wars,” to sell out during its debut on Jan. 9. Set in the original trilogy era, the happenings of the story arc, “In the Shadow of Yavin,” document the fallout from the destruction of the Death Star by the Rebel Alliance.

Within a few days of its release, Dark Horse staff announced a second print would be made available on Feb. 6, featuring a cover stripped of any text, so fans can revel in the cover art by comic legend Alex Ross.

The same day as the first issue’s release, a blog entry by the comic’s writer, Brian Wood, was ran on StarWars.com, and a few days later re-posted on Dark Horse’s website. Wood shares he aimed to capture the tone and feel of the original trilogy and feature a story that transpires only days after the final events of “A New Hope.”

Wood teases the series will be, “heavy on space battles and snubfighter dogfights. A series that gets into the emotional states of our post-Tattooine, post-Alderaan, post-Yavin characters who have lost so much yet press on in their fight for freedom.”

If there were any doubts that Wood would deliver the space battles and tales of peril he promises, fans were rewarded with a four-page preview of “Star Wars” #2 through the digital pages of Entertainment Weekly.

What is guaranteed to entice another sold out issue is the reveal that the second issue features the infamous bounty hunter, Boba Fett. In the preview, we see the Millennium Falcon avoiding fire by Slave I as the smugglers navigate space debris.

Scheduled for release on Feb. 13, the second issue hones in on Han Solo and Chewbacca as they attempt to evade the capture of Boba Fett; we’ll also see Darth Vader carry out a secret mission assigned to him by the Emperor.  

While the Empire doesn’t formally issue a bounty for Han Solo and company until “Empire Strikes Back,” it is already known after Solo’s encounter with Greedo in “A New Hope” that he is wanted by Jabba the Hutt.

Hiding in space debris, Solo believes they’re safe from being found, however, a ship appears on their radar. When identifying the ship, Solo realizes the immediate danger once they see Slave I fast approaching. Why is this interesting? This tells us Solo and Boba Fett have a history before the happenings of the original trilogy.

The chase between Fett and Solo is a common trope in Star Wars comics, so the challenge for Woods will be to make it fresh and new. How will Han Solo escape, or will he? I’d be interested to see what story unfolds if Solo and Chewbacca are actually captured – and later escape, of course.

Whatever happens though, this story needs to expand on the relationship between the bounty hunter and smuggler – besides the tired “cat and mouse” angle to their encounters. Unlike other bounty hunters, consider his run in with Greedo at the Catina – the films illustrate Han Solo having a genuine fear toward Fett.

I’m crossing my fingers we get a tale that explains why Solo takes the threat of Boba Fett more seriously than other hired guns.