The Boba Bounty

Your latest news and speculation on Boba Fett's presence in Star Wars film, television, comics, video games and collectibles. Also, the originator of the #BringBackBoba Campaign.

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Note: The following blog contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars” #10.

If you’ve followed my reviews of “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin,” then you’re well familiar with my feelings on the overuse of story tropes we’ve seen in Star Wars comics for decades. One of the most common of these tropes is with subplots between Han Solo and Boba Fett.

Earlier this year, when Entertainment Weekly ran a sneak peek at “Star Wars” #2, I was excited to see Boba Fett would be introduced in this title – but, I was also wary from the fact it appeared to be the same story we’ve seen too many times – Boba Fett chases Han Solo, the smuggler escapes, Boba Fett catches up, and the smuggler once again escapes. No payoff, no consequences.

Although the subplot was dragged out, the appearance of Bossk as Boba Fett’s partner gave me hope there’d be more to the confrontation. I was very interested in seeing how the two bounty hunters hooked up, and wanted to see an altercation that would shed light into Han Solo’s reaction to the bounty hunter in Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.

I also wanted to see the relationship explained between Boba Fett and Bossk. Something had to have happened to explain why they worked together to hunt down Solo after the Battle of Yavin, but they worked apart during Empire. What was the falling out?

However, we got none of this. In “Star Wars” #10, we receive a gripping illustration of Boba Fett clinging to the Millennium Falcon in a last ditch effort to claim his prize. The Falcon crew loses their “extra cargo” upon leaving the planet’s atmosphere.

In one of the last panels of the confrontation, Perla says, “You two can continue this another time,” which is almost funny if the trope wasn’t so tired. Is this a nod from writer Brian Wood that he understands how many times we’ve seen this same story unfold?

While I love seeing Boba Fett in comics, when nothing new or original is shown through the story, I feel it just makes the story flat and one dimensional.

Looking for something colorful or breathtaking for your Geekcave? Some new Boba Fett artwork have made their way onto the Internet this past week.

It’s not too often limited edition prints are made at affordable prices, so it’s not shocker that Tom Hodges’ “Boba and his Bounty” sold out pretty fast. In fact, as you read this, the item has been removed from his etsy page – sold out before 8 a.m. two days ago.

If you missed out on Hodges’ piece, another affordable, but fantastic piece is available for pre-order at EntertainmentEarth.com. “Luke To The Rescue,” is a hand-numbered limited edition of 95 pieces, measuring 19 inches tall by 13 inches wide and available for $89.

The piece illustrates Luke’s heroic scene on the Desert Skiff in Return of the Jedi, as he faces off against Boba Fett during his rescue mission. The artist, James Silvani, has a unique and fresh approach to his artwork – fantastic for your child’s room or hanging over your collection of animated style Star Wars toys.

Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars” #9.

We’re now nine issues deep into the first story arc of Dark Horse’s “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin.” The story by Brian Wood is superb and continues to capture the spirit of the Original Trilogy, the art is stunning every issue and the book keeps a swift pace – however, I feel this is a story better read in trade paperback.

Having to wait a month between each issue is frustrating, because Wood checks in with each subplot every time. While it’s nice to provide face time to each fan favorite, it’s like watching three minutes of a movie each day – sure, we’ll get to the peak of drama eventually, but its sure taking a while to get there. Each week I keep hoping the next issue is where all the subplots will meet for a giant payoff.

In “Star Wars” #9, Luke Skywalker and Wedge Atilles escape custody and are maneuvering toward the data core to bug the communication system. We get a tie in to The Clone Wars, with Princess Leia receiving contact by the Audacity, a ship from the wartime era. The most staggered storyline, though, continues to be Boba Fett and Han Solo.

At the end of Issue #8, a long-awaiting gunfight was teased between the smuggler and bounty hunter. Promotional images further promised an engaging encounter, as we saw images of Boba Fett ejecting from Slave I to pursue Han Solo face-to-face.

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The dialogue written for Boba Fett is great, stating that Jabba pays more for his bounties to be turned in whole, rather than blown to smithereens. However, we’re denied a decent gunfight, as Perla crashes a platform, quickly evading the bounty hunter. Also, we see Bossk hot on the tail of the Falcon, being piloted by Chewbacca.

In the previous issue, there was a passing comment about bounty hunters not usually crossing into Imperial compounds or stations. Unless we see it in the forthcoming issue, I think this was a missed opportunity. All the chaos and destruction and Imperial agents aren’t swarming onto scene?

Woods could have had Imperial Troopers arrive on scene, and that, in my opinion, could have been a better distraction to allow Perla and Solo to escape. Also, more chances to show Boba Fett in action. Once again, we continue to watch the cat-and-mouse game between the two men – which I continue to have faith will result in a payoff in the end.

"Star Wars" #10 will be available Oct. 9.



Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars #8

In “Star Wars” #8 we finally get more than just a handful of panels dealing with the subplot of Han Solo on the run from Boba Fett and Bossk. The chase began in issue #2 and we’ve been building to a hopeful conflict – which writer Brian Wood delivers in this action packed issue.

While Luke Skywalker and Wedge sneak aboard a Star Destroyer, the real action takes place on Coruscant. We are treated to a massive dogfight, that highlights the cunning evasive skills of Chewbacca and Han Solo – as well as showcases the hunting skills of Boba Fett.

When we last left Han Solo and Chewbacca, they had hired garbage-barge pilot, Perla, to aid them in an escape from bounty hunters Boba Fett and Bossk, who tracked them to Coruscant. The smugglers are forced to split up as Slave I engages them – navigating the Falcon as Han Solo and Perla remain aboard the barge.

The tactic worked, as Boba Fett hadn’t planned on a firefight above the Imperial Center. With Chewbacca’s counterattacks on the Slave I, Fett is forced to allow the Garbage-barge to gain distance – the risk of killing Solo in the dogfight is too high, and he attends to capture him alive to collect on the dual bounty, one from the Hutt Cartel and the other the Empire.

Han Solo tells Perla he is surprised to see the bounty hunter in an Imperial Jurisdiction. Unfortunately for Perla and Solo, the space battle put them on the Imperial security radar, blowing their cover in the process. Once catching up, the Slave I continue to attack the garbage-barge, but aims for its cargo, resulting in Perla to lose large portions of her cargo and jeopardizing their ability to maneuver.

Meanwhile, Bossk chases down Chewbacca in the Falcon. The bounty is on Solo’s head, so Bossk is intent on destroying both, the Falcon and Chewbacca.

Han Solo crashes the barge into the Imperial Center. He believes it’s a calculated risk, which will payoff in their escape, but the plan comes up short as Slave I hones in one the smuggler and Perla, with them outgunned and without a ship on the ground floor of the Imperial Center.

There are several items of note in this issue: first, Wood emphasizes that it’s unusual for Boba Fett to engage his prey in Imperial borders. This must be foreshadowing for the next issue, why are these areas off limits to Boba Fett? Could his saving grace be Imperial Security Forces stepping in right as Slave I closes in on the marooned Perla and Solo?

Ryan Kelly’s art goes above and beyond in this issue. The most haunting image, in my opinion, are the skulls and bodily remains decorating Bossk’s cockpit seat.

We’ve still yet to be told how Boba Fett and Bossk became a team in this issue. Or are they building on the rebooted relationship between the two, which has already been expanded upon in The Clone Wars?

The confrontation will continue in “Star Wars” #9 will be released on Sept. 11

In the latest issue of Geek Magazine, its writing team sat down with Steven Melching, writer of The Clone Wars, and Chris Gossett, Star Wars artist, to gain their insight into the popularity of Boba Fett. This Q&A was a sidebar to a larger feature, looking at the Saga’s standing in the fan community.

“After briefly being introduced in The Star Wars Holiday Special, bounty hunter Boba Fett made a more impressive entrance to the Star Wars mythos in The Empire Strikes Back, in which he instantly captivated the imaginations of fans everywhere. The character’s enduring popularity led to him being added into the original Star Wars in the 1997 Special Edition release and becoming a vital part of the prequels years later. So why has Boba Fett become such a fan favorite opposed to some of his brooding brethren, such as IG-88 and Bossk? We turned to our Star Wars experts to get their thoughts on Fett’s enduring Mandalorian appeal.” - Geek Magazine

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Melching accredited Boba Fett’s popularity to the mystique the character carried prior to the release of Empire. He believes the promotional action figure also endeared fans to the character – many impressed by his armor, specifically the fact he was rumored to have taken down Wookiees – even wearing a braid of his Wookiee targets over his gear.

“I think a big reason why Fett became so popular was because we really didn’t know a whole lot about him. He was described as a Mandalorian Shock Trooper. Who the hell were they?” Melching said. “Did they fight in the Clone Wars? Could he be this ‘other’ that Yoda spoke of? All this anticipation made his ignominious demise in Return of the Jedi all the more crushing.”

Gossett chimed in, saying the prequels screwed up the character in his opinion. Making Boba Fett a clone was one of the major problems in the prequels, he said. Gossett believes one of the characteristics beloved about Fett was he was Han Solo without a soul – Boba Fett was what Solo might have become if he made different choices as a smuggler.

“Showing that contrast was one of the functions Boba Fett served, and he served it damn well. The fact that Lucas just dropped him into the Sarlacc Pit was a sign of poor choices to come,” Gossett said.

According to Melching, the main protagonist of Episode VI was supposed to be Boba Fett. The Sarlacc was a quick solution when George Lucas decided to squash Episode VII-IX into Return of the Jedi – which was supposed to feature Han Solo versus Boba Fett, with the Skywalker story only introduced at the end leading to the next trilogy.

“Fans still refuse to accept that he died in the Sarlacc Pit… He became a major player in the Clone Wars series, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he turns up in Episode VII or as a central character in one of the rumored ‘spin-off’ movies,” Melching said.

 

Could Han Solo and Boba Fett be named couple of the year for 2013?

A few weeks ago rumors flew around the Internet about spin-off films featuring the smuggler and bounty hunter. Then at last week’s New York City Toy Fair, it was announced an exclusive 6-inch Black Series Boba Fett figure, toting Han Solo in Carbonite, would be available at the upcoming San Diego Comic Con.

(It has been confirmed Han Solo in Carbonite would only be available through the comic con, but it is unclear whether Boba Fett’s figure is also a special offer. Since he’s not been named in the first wave of figures in the new series, I’m leaning toward, yes.)

Hasbro also said it would release Boba Fett’s Slave I, with Han Solo in Carbonite, in traditional scale, as an Amazon.com exclusive this spring. The item is part of Hasbro’s Vintage Collection.

Additionally note, Boba Fett made an appearance in Dark Horse’s “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin” #2, which hinted at future altercations between the smuggler and Fett throughout the story arc. Not to get off topic, but I’m still crossing my fingers the subplot will introduce a fresh angle to the two men’s relationship.

While it’s exciting to see new Boba Fett merchandise hit the shelves, I’m growing tired of how Hasbro executes the release of new figures and ships. Its common knowledge that Boba Fett’s was first offered as a mail-away offer through Kenner, and the controversial “missile firing action” tied to the toy.

If you take an inventory of past Boba Fett figures, quite a few have not been included in the base sets, but instead, have been obtained through special offers. Most often you have to purchase five Star Wars action figures and mail their proof-of-purchases.

Even action figures that aren’t mail-away offers are hard to find. Take for example the “Rise of Boba Fett” battle set, which included a young Boba Fett, Slave I in his father’s color scheme and a number of other figures and a star fighter. This set was an exclusive to Toys ‘R Us and not stocked very deep.

The Villain Set featuring Boba Fett, Snaggletooth and a Tusken Raider was a Target exclusive. There’s only a few recent examples of Fett action figures that have been found at multiple retailers and in decent quantities.

Due to the practice of releasing Boba Fett toys as exclusives or special offers, if you’re a targeted collector, like I am, this results in having to end up paying more in the second market. I hope that in future releases; if Hasbro continues to make it more difficult to grab Boba Fett merchandise they will at least execute their figure design in a new way.

Instead of another repaint of past figures, I want to see new accessories and molds. This is one reason I’m excited about the 6-inch Black Series action figure, and hope it will find its way into retail stores, rather than eBay or swap meets.

Hasbro appears to be putting a lot of effort and thought into the accessories in their 6-inch line. I’ve been musing upon what new weapons; items may be included in the Boba Fett figure. What are you hoping might be included with the 6-inch Boba Fett?

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Note: This blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin” #2

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The second issue to the bestselling title, “Star Wars,” is full of secret missions and familiar faces – along with some surprises.

When Entertainment Weekly published a sneak peak at this issue last month, it turns out that was the opening for this month’s story. Han Solo and Chewbacca are drifting in the Corsair Outback, on a rendezvous mission assigned by Mon Monthma.

Even though they sit in deep space, among space debris, the smuggler and his companion are discovered by Slave I. This story transpires before Empire Strikes Back, so Boba Fett is hunting Solo due to the bounty placed on his head by Jabba the Hutt.

Solo is forced to make a space jump after Slave I opens fire on his ship. They end up making seven jumps before they’re clear of the bounty hunter. This was disappointing – the issue was marketed as showing the appearance of Boba Fett – but we never actually see the Mandalorian. In fact, the three page preview is the entirety of Fett’s appearance in the issue.

This was a chance for Dark Horse to tear down common tropes comic books have executed with the relationship between Boba Fett and Han Solo. Instead, they kept to the formula of Han Solo being tracked down by Fett, he makes a run for it and escapes. Let’s hope this story arc doesn’t consist of repeated “near encounters” between the adversaries.

I’ve said this in an earlier blog entry – let Solo be captured by Boba Fett, but manage to escape. We need to see why the presence of Boba Fett strikes the fear Solo experiences in the films, that don’t come up with other encounters with bounty hunters, like Greedo.

The issue also sets up two more plot points. In many ways this issue sets up what we should anticipate for the rest of the story arc. Monthma gives Leia a secret assignment, as does the Emperor to Darth Vader. These secret assignments introduce two characters to keep an eye on.

Leia puts together a team of X-Wing pilots to conduct a secret mission to locate a base for the Rebels. This assignment must be done in secret, because Monthma suspects a spy in their ranks.

Among the pilots is Rus Kal from Durkteel. Kal is part of a subspecies of Transdoshan – the race of Bossk. I’m engaged by this member of the team. I don’t know too much about this species, but I have to wonder how close their characteristics are from their cousins, Transdoshans.

Am I overanalyzing things, or is this foreshadowing that we may see Bossk in the near future pop up?

The second character of interest is Colonel Bircher, who has been put in charge of Darth Vader’s crew and Star Destroyer. While Vader is on his secret mission, Bircher is leading the charge of hunting down the Rebel Alliance.

I enjoyed this issue and the artwork is some of the best that’s come out of Dark Horse, besides the work being down in “Agent of the Empire.” I need to emphasize my disappointment though, we were teased with Boba Fett and Darth Vader in the official synopsis of the issue, but Boba Fett is only in a couple panels and Vader is only mentioned by name.

Earlier this week Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company, announced during a televised interview several spinoff movies were in development. Iger said the original focus was on the sequel trilogy, but these stand alone films have been on the table since their earliest discussions.

Lucasfilm officials followed up on Feb. 5 with a press release confirming the involvement of screenwriters Lawrence Kasdan and Simon Kinberg. These names excited fans, as Kasdan was the scribe for not only The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark, but also co-wrote Return of the Jedi. Kinberg has also proved himself, with blockbusters like Sherlock Holmes.

They also confirmed that two spinoff films were in development, sparking speculation throughout the Internet.

According to Feb. 6 online article by Entertainment Weekly, the films will focus on a young Han Solo and Boba Fett, respectively. They cited sources close to both projects. Of course, Lucasfilm and Disney declined to comment or confirm this information.

Entertainment Weekly reported the Boba Fett film could either take place between A New Hope and Empire Strikes Back, or between Empire and Return of the Jedi. They added further, Temuera Morrison is the shoe in to take on the role as the infamous bounty hunter.

I have my doubts about Entertainment Weekly’s “exclusive,” because they also said there’s no indication of who may direct these films – which Lucasfilm had already announced the day previous to the column’s online publishing that the two films already have directors – Kasdan and Kinberg – why wouldn’t sources close to the projects know this?   

Since Iger made his announcement, websites have been spilling all kinds of rumors and information about the spinoff movies. However, most of these news sources that have “exclusive” information also present bogus information, like that Han Solo was a “bounty hunter with a conscious who befriended Luke Skywalker” or misspelling Lucasfilm.

I have no doubt that a Boba Fett film is being discussed behind the secretive walls of Lucasfilm and Disney, but take everything with a grain of salt, until there’s further announcements by Disney or Lucasfilm.

It only took 24 hours for Dark Horse’s new series, “Star Wars,” to sell out during its debut on Jan. 9. Set in the original trilogy era, the happenings of the story arc, “In the Shadow of Yavin,” document the fallout from the destruction of the Death Star by the Rebel Alliance.

Within a few days of its release, Dark Horse staff announced a second print would be made available on Feb. 6, featuring a cover stripped of any text, so fans can revel in the cover art by comic legend Alex Ross.

The same day as the first issue’s release, a blog entry by the comic’s writer, Brian Wood, was ran on StarWars.com, and a few days later re-posted on Dark Horse’s website. Wood shares he aimed to capture the tone and feel of the original trilogy and feature a story that transpires only days after the final events of “A New Hope.”

Wood teases the series will be, “heavy on space battles and snubfighter dogfights. A series that gets into the emotional states of our post-Tattooine, post-Alderaan, post-Yavin characters who have lost so much yet press on in their fight for freedom.”

If there were any doubts that Wood would deliver the space battles and tales of peril he promises, fans were rewarded with a four-page preview of “Star Wars” #2 through the digital pages of Entertainment Weekly.

What is guaranteed to entice another sold out issue is the reveal that the second issue features the infamous bounty hunter, Boba Fett. In the preview, we see the Millennium Falcon avoiding fire by Slave I as the smugglers navigate space debris.

Scheduled for release on Feb. 13, the second issue hones in on Han Solo and Chewbacca as they attempt to evade the capture of Boba Fett; we’ll also see Darth Vader carry out a secret mission assigned to him by the Emperor.  

While the Empire doesn’t formally issue a bounty for Han Solo and company until “Empire Strikes Back,” it is already known after Solo’s encounter with Greedo in “A New Hope” that he is wanted by Jabba the Hutt.

Hiding in space debris, Solo believes they’re safe from being found, however, a ship appears on their radar. When identifying the ship, Solo realizes the immediate danger once they see Slave I fast approaching. Why is this interesting? This tells us Solo and Boba Fett have a history before the happenings of the original trilogy.

The chase between Fett and Solo is a common trope in Star Wars comics, so the challenge for Woods will be to make it fresh and new. How will Han Solo escape, or will he? I’d be interested to see what story unfolds if Solo and Chewbacca are actually captured – and later escape, of course.

Whatever happens though, this story needs to expand on the relationship between the bounty hunter and smuggler – besides the tired “cat and mouse” angle to their encounters. Unlike other bounty hunters, consider his run in with Greedo at the Catina – the films illustrate Han Solo having a genuine fear toward Fett.

I’m crossing my fingers we get a tale that explains why Solo takes the threat of Boba Fett more seriously than other hired guns.

I finally got the chance to sit down, plug in and listen to Smuggler’s Gambit – an audio drama performed live at Celebration VI on Aug. 22.

The story pulls you back to the era of the original trilogy. Han Solo and Chewbacca are assigned with finding a new base for the Rebel Alliance, but when Solo and Chewie runs into an old acquaintance that aims to claim Jabba’s bounty, they fear being hunted could complicate things for the rebellion.

Han Solo and his Wookiee companion record a message for Luke Skywalker then sneak away, planning to return to their former line of work. Trouble soon follows them, when Solo is captured by an aspiring smuggler named Ro Kurota and held for auction to the highest bidder – including representatives from The Black Sun and Jabba’s Palace.

This original script is penned by Kyle Newman of Fanboys and F.J. DeSanto. The tantalizing script, paired with more than 100 sound effects engineered by Jimmy “Mac” McInerney of ForceCast.net make for a fun adventure in the same spirit of the original films.

On an edition of Star Wars Transmissions, host Christ Gore interviews Newman, who sits on stage with the entire cast of Smuggler’s Gambit. Newman said he was shocked at the reception of their project. He aimed to provide fun entertainment for fans, but never expected the people to embrace the audio play with such rigor.

With the help of Dave Filoni, supervising director for The Clone Wars, Newman was able to secure a lot of The Clone Wars cast for the performance. According to Newman, the cast only had about a half hour between receiving the scripts and going on stage – illustrating the chemistry they’ve built and their performance power.

When asked if further audio adventures are on the horizon, Newman throws the question to the cast – who all smile, raise their hands and cast their votes in favor for more. So, we should expect more of these in the future, possibly at the next Celebration.

When a hefty bounty is in play, you can expect Boba Fett to make an appearance. Daniel Logan once again performs the role of our favorite bounty hunter. Logan has played the part of a young Boba Fett in the prequel trilogy and in The Clone Wars. This is our first time experiencing the actor performing an older version of his character.

Logan’s voice work is on key, but not overused – supplying logic and calmness in a scene where the characters are running high on emotion and caught up in personal rivalries.

I’ll save the spoilers, but recommend giving a listen to the full audio, which runs about 35 minutes.

http://starwarsblog.starwars.com/index.php/2012/11/28/smugglers-gambit-full-audio/#more-18597