The Boba Bounty

Your latest news and speculation on Boba Fett's presence in Star Wars film, television, comics, video games and collectibles. Also, the originator of the #BringBackBoba Campaign.

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Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars #8

In “Star Wars” #8 we finally get more than just a handful of panels dealing with the subplot of Han Solo on the run from Boba Fett and Bossk. The chase began in issue #2 and we’ve been building to a hopeful conflict – which writer Brian Wood delivers in this action packed issue.

While Luke Skywalker and Wedge sneak aboard a Star Destroyer, the real action takes place on Coruscant. We are treated to a massive dogfight, that highlights the cunning evasive skills of Chewbacca and Han Solo – as well as showcases the hunting skills of Boba Fett.

When we last left Han Solo and Chewbacca, they had hired garbage-barge pilot, Perla, to aid them in an escape from bounty hunters Boba Fett and Bossk, who tracked them to Coruscant. The smugglers are forced to split up as Slave I engages them – navigating the Falcon as Han Solo and Perla remain aboard the barge.

The tactic worked, as Boba Fett hadn’t planned on a firefight above the Imperial Center. With Chewbacca’s counterattacks on the Slave I, Fett is forced to allow the Garbage-barge to gain distance – the risk of killing Solo in the dogfight is too high, and he attends to capture him alive to collect on the dual bounty, one from the Hutt Cartel and the other the Empire.

Han Solo tells Perla he is surprised to see the bounty hunter in an Imperial Jurisdiction. Unfortunately for Perla and Solo, the space battle put them on the Imperial security radar, blowing their cover in the process. Once catching up, the Slave I continue to attack the garbage-barge, but aims for its cargo, resulting in Perla to lose large portions of her cargo and jeopardizing their ability to maneuver.

Meanwhile, Bossk chases down Chewbacca in the Falcon. The bounty is on Solo’s head, so Bossk is intent on destroying both, the Falcon and Chewbacca.

Han Solo crashes the barge into the Imperial Center. He believes it’s a calculated risk, which will payoff in their escape, but the plan comes up short as Slave I hones in one the smuggler and Perla, with them outgunned and without a ship on the ground floor of the Imperial Center.

There are several items of note in this issue: first, Wood emphasizes that it’s unusual for Boba Fett to engage his prey in Imperial borders. This must be foreshadowing for the next issue, why are these areas off limits to Boba Fett? Could his saving grace be Imperial Security Forces stepping in right as Slave I closes in on the marooned Perla and Solo?

Ryan Kelly’s art goes above and beyond in this issue. The most haunting image, in my opinion, are the skulls and bodily remains decorating Bossk’s cockpit seat.

We’ve still yet to be told how Boba Fett and Bossk became a team in this issue. Or are they building on the rebooted relationship between the two, which has already been expanded upon in The Clone Wars?

The confrontation will continue in “Star Wars” #9 will be released on Sept. 11

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Note: This blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin” #2

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The second issue to the bestselling title, “Star Wars,” is full of secret missions and familiar faces – along with some surprises.

When Entertainment Weekly published a sneak peak at this issue last month, it turns out that was the opening for this month’s story. Han Solo and Chewbacca are drifting in the Corsair Outback, on a rendezvous mission assigned by Mon Monthma.

Even though they sit in deep space, among space debris, the smuggler and his companion are discovered by Slave I. This story transpires before Empire Strikes Back, so Boba Fett is hunting Solo due to the bounty placed on his head by Jabba the Hutt.

Solo is forced to make a space jump after Slave I opens fire on his ship. They end up making seven jumps before they’re clear of the bounty hunter. This was disappointing – the issue was marketed as showing the appearance of Boba Fett – but we never actually see the Mandalorian. In fact, the three page preview is the entirety of Fett’s appearance in the issue.

This was a chance for Dark Horse to tear down common tropes comic books have executed with the relationship between Boba Fett and Han Solo. Instead, they kept to the formula of Han Solo being tracked down by Fett, he makes a run for it and escapes. Let’s hope this story arc doesn’t consist of repeated “near encounters” between the adversaries.

I’ve said this in an earlier blog entry – let Solo be captured by Boba Fett, but manage to escape. We need to see why the presence of Boba Fett strikes the fear Solo experiences in the films, that don’t come up with other encounters with bounty hunters, like Greedo.

The issue also sets up two more plot points. In many ways this issue sets up what we should anticipate for the rest of the story arc. Monthma gives Leia a secret assignment, as does the Emperor to Darth Vader. These secret assignments introduce two characters to keep an eye on.

Leia puts together a team of X-Wing pilots to conduct a secret mission to locate a base for the Rebels. This assignment must be done in secret, because Monthma suspects a spy in their ranks.

Among the pilots is Rus Kal from Durkteel. Kal is part of a subspecies of Transdoshan – the race of Bossk. I’m engaged by this member of the team. I don’t know too much about this species, but I have to wonder how close their characteristics are from their cousins, Transdoshans.

Am I overanalyzing things, or is this foreshadowing that we may see Bossk in the near future pop up?

The second character of interest is Colonel Bircher, who has been put in charge of Darth Vader’s crew and Star Destroyer. While Vader is on his secret mission, Bircher is leading the charge of hunting down the Rebel Alliance.

I enjoyed this issue and the artwork is some of the best that’s come out of Dark Horse, besides the work being down in “Agent of the Empire.” I need to emphasize my disappointment though, we were teased with Boba Fett and Darth Vader in the official synopsis of the issue, but Boba Fett is only in a couple panels and Vader is only mentioned by name.

It only took 24 hours for Dark Horse’s new series, “Star Wars,” to sell out during its debut on Jan. 9. Set in the original trilogy era, the happenings of the story arc, “In the Shadow of Yavin,” document the fallout from the destruction of the Death Star by the Rebel Alliance.

Within a few days of its release, Dark Horse staff announced a second print would be made available on Feb. 6, featuring a cover stripped of any text, so fans can revel in the cover art by comic legend Alex Ross.

The same day as the first issue’s release, a blog entry by the comic’s writer, Brian Wood, was ran on StarWars.com, and a few days later re-posted on Dark Horse’s website. Wood shares he aimed to capture the tone and feel of the original trilogy and feature a story that transpires only days after the final events of “A New Hope.”

Wood teases the series will be, “heavy on space battles and snubfighter dogfights. A series that gets into the emotional states of our post-Tattooine, post-Alderaan, post-Yavin characters who have lost so much yet press on in their fight for freedom.”

If there were any doubts that Wood would deliver the space battles and tales of peril he promises, fans were rewarded with a four-page preview of “Star Wars” #2 through the digital pages of Entertainment Weekly.

What is guaranteed to entice another sold out issue is the reveal that the second issue features the infamous bounty hunter, Boba Fett. In the preview, we see the Millennium Falcon avoiding fire by Slave I as the smugglers navigate space debris.

Scheduled for release on Feb. 13, the second issue hones in on Han Solo and Chewbacca as they attempt to evade the capture of Boba Fett; we’ll also see Darth Vader carry out a secret mission assigned to him by the Emperor.  

While the Empire doesn’t formally issue a bounty for Han Solo and company until “Empire Strikes Back,” it is already known after Solo’s encounter with Greedo in “A New Hope” that he is wanted by Jabba the Hutt.

Hiding in space debris, Solo believes they’re safe from being found, however, a ship appears on their radar. When identifying the ship, Solo realizes the immediate danger once they see Slave I fast approaching. Why is this interesting? This tells us Solo and Boba Fett have a history before the happenings of the original trilogy.

The chase between Fett and Solo is a common trope in Star Wars comics, so the challenge for Woods will be to make it fresh and new. How will Han Solo escape, or will he? I’d be interested to see what story unfolds if Solo and Chewbacca are actually captured – and later escape, of course.

Whatever happens though, this story needs to expand on the relationship between the bounty hunter and smuggler – besides the tired “cat and mouse” angle to their encounters. Unlike other bounty hunters, consider his run in with Greedo at the Catina – the films illustrate Han Solo having a genuine fear toward Fett.

I’m crossing my fingers we get a tale that explains why Solo takes the threat of Boba Fett more seriously than other hired guns.

I finally got the chance to sit down, plug in and listen to Smuggler’s Gambit – an audio drama performed live at Celebration VI on Aug. 22.

The story pulls you back to the era of the original trilogy. Han Solo and Chewbacca are assigned with finding a new base for the Rebel Alliance, but when Solo and Chewie runs into an old acquaintance that aims to claim Jabba’s bounty, they fear being hunted could complicate things for the rebellion.

Han Solo and his Wookiee companion record a message for Luke Skywalker then sneak away, planning to return to their former line of work. Trouble soon follows them, when Solo is captured by an aspiring smuggler named Ro Kurota and held for auction to the highest bidder – including representatives from The Black Sun and Jabba’s Palace.

This original script is penned by Kyle Newman of Fanboys and F.J. DeSanto. The tantalizing script, paired with more than 100 sound effects engineered by Jimmy “Mac” McInerney of ForceCast.net make for a fun adventure in the same spirit of the original films.

On an edition of Star Wars Transmissions, host Christ Gore interviews Newman, who sits on stage with the entire cast of Smuggler’s Gambit. Newman said he was shocked at the reception of their project. He aimed to provide fun entertainment for fans, but never expected the people to embrace the audio play with such rigor.

With the help of Dave Filoni, supervising director for The Clone Wars, Newman was able to secure a lot of The Clone Wars cast for the performance. According to Newman, the cast only had about a half hour between receiving the scripts and going on stage – illustrating the chemistry they’ve built and their performance power.

When asked if further audio adventures are on the horizon, Newman throws the question to the cast – who all smile, raise their hands and cast their votes in favor for more. So, we should expect more of these in the future, possibly at the next Celebration.

When a hefty bounty is in play, you can expect Boba Fett to make an appearance. Daniel Logan once again performs the role of our favorite bounty hunter. Logan has played the part of a young Boba Fett in the prequel trilogy and in The Clone Wars. This is our first time experiencing the actor performing an older version of his character.

Logan’s voice work is on key, but not overused – supplying logic and calmness in a scene where the characters are running high on emotion and caught up in personal rivalries.

I’ll save the spoilers, but recommend giving a listen to the full audio, which runs about 35 minutes.

http://starwarsblog.starwars.com/index.php/2012/11/28/smugglers-gambit-full-audio/#more-18597

Boba Fett was featured on front cover and inside of the Nov. 23 issue of Entertainment Weekly. Managing editor Jess Cagle’s commentary on the inside page made an aside that when developing the cover art for this week’s issue, their was an internal debate on whether they should have used Chewbacca’s image instead of Boba Fett - but in the end the bounty hunter won out. Boba Fett beating Chewbacca for a place on the cover has a touch of irony, since Boba is known for wearing Wookie braids attached to his cape.

Boba Fett was featured on front cover and inside of the Nov. 23 issue of Entertainment Weekly. Managing editor Jess Cagle’s commentary on the inside page made an aside that when developing the cover art for this week’s issue, their was an internal debate on whether they should have used Chewbacca’s image instead of Boba Fett - but in the end the bounty hunter won out. Boba Fett beating Chewbacca for a place on the cover has a touch of irony, since Boba is known for wearing Wookie braids attached to his cape.

The Star Wars Celebration VI event took place this past August at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. The celebration included a competitive art show, showcasing exclusive prints of Star Wars artwork by various artists – 36 pieces were chosen for display and purchasing, including two that focus on Boba Fett.

The piece, “Boba Fett – Concept to Realization,” was created by graphic designer Jeff Confer and is an officially licensed product of Star Wars, although no price has been set on the item. Its specs are 18 inches by 24 inches and limited to 250 prints. Confer has been commissioned to illustrate sketch card sets for Topps, Rittenhouse Archives and Bad Axe Studios. See more of his work and order exclusive prints at www.jpc.art.co.cc.

The piece consists of four panels that show Boba Fett’s evolution from his white prototype armor to the classic green and gray armor we’ve all come to know. The print is cleanly executed and the colors are crisp with amazing attention to detail.

“On the Hunt for The Great Chewbacca” is an oil painting by artist Christian Waggoner and is also limited to 250 prints, each available for $70 and measuring 18 inches by 24 inches. Waggoner is known for his work on the Star Wars “Reflection” series, “Star Wars: Visions” and “Star Wars: Illustrations” that was published in September.

I really love Waggoner’s work. Boba Fett is painted in gritty style and draped in a flag. Holding blasters in both hands, the image is reminiscent of the patriotic paintings of heroes during wartime. Chewbacca is in Boba Fett’s sights, as his reflection is clearly seen on the surface of Fett’s visor.

Boba Fett also makes montage appearances in the following submissions: “The Empire Strikes Back,” by Katie Cook; “The Saga of Solo,” by Mark McHaley; “Ally or Enemy,” by David Rabbitte; “ROTJ,” by Brian Rood and “Return of the Jedi,” by Jerry Vanderstelt.

For further information, visit www.starwarscelebration.com.