The Boba Bounty

Your latest news and speculation on Boba Fett's presence in Star Wars film, television, comics, video games and collectibles. Also, the originator of the #BringBackBoba Campaign.

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Barnes & Noble has a wide selection of bookmarks, featuring art from Empire Strikes Back. The Boba Fett bookmark grabbed my eye, with a floating head design of Boba Fett atop the shot of the bounty hunters lined up for Darth Vader’s roll call.

Check out this breathtaking photo entitled Bossk’s Cool Day Out, by Vesa Lehtimaki. We saw this shared by our friends at BobaFett.com and just had to re-share. The imagery is perfect for this time of year; I can just imagine Jango Fett, dressed in his Santa Claus attire from the Advent Calendar, navigating Slave I.

Rebelscum.com shared the bounty hunter-theme greeting card being sent out by Lucasfilm this year. Possibly my new favorite holiday-theme Star Wars illustration, it depicts our favorite headhunters caroling. Bossk’s face is priceless.

You may have seen the prepackaged Star Wars Illustrated trading cards in this month’s Star Wars Insider. Here’s a peak at one of the cards featuring Boba Fett, seen partnered with Bossk, which continues the retcon relationship between the two bounty hunters adopted after The Clone Wars. The series debuts Nov. 6.

Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars” #9.

We’re now nine issues deep into the first story arc of Dark Horse’s “Star Wars: In the Shadow of Yavin.” The story by Brian Wood is superb and continues to capture the spirit of the Original Trilogy, the art is stunning every issue and the book keeps a swift pace – however, I feel this is a story better read in trade paperback.

Having to wait a month between each issue is frustrating, because Wood checks in with each subplot every time. While it’s nice to provide face time to each fan favorite, it’s like watching three minutes of a movie each day – sure, we’ll get to the peak of drama eventually, but its sure taking a while to get there. Each week I keep hoping the next issue is where all the subplots will meet for a giant payoff.

In “Star Wars” #9, Luke Skywalker and Wedge Atilles escape custody and are maneuvering toward the data core to bug the communication system. We get a tie in to The Clone Wars, with Princess Leia receiving contact by the Audacity, a ship from the wartime era. The most staggered storyline, though, continues to be Boba Fett and Han Solo.

At the end of Issue #8, a long-awaiting gunfight was teased between the smuggler and bounty hunter. Promotional images further promised an engaging encounter, as we saw images of Boba Fett ejecting from Slave I to pursue Han Solo face-to-face.

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The dialogue written for Boba Fett is great, stating that Jabba pays more for his bounties to be turned in whole, rather than blown to smithereens. However, we’re denied a decent gunfight, as Perla crashes a platform, quickly evading the bounty hunter. Also, we see Bossk hot on the tail of the Falcon, being piloted by Chewbacca.

In the previous issue, there was a passing comment about bounty hunters not usually crossing into Imperial compounds or stations. Unless we see it in the forthcoming issue, I think this was a missed opportunity. All the chaos and destruction and Imperial agents aren’t swarming onto scene?

Woods could have had Imperial Troopers arrive on scene, and that, in my opinion, could have been a better distraction to allow Perla and Solo to escape. Also, more chances to show Boba Fett in action. Once again, we continue to watch the cat-and-mouse game between the two men – which I continue to have faith will result in a payoff in the end.

"Star Wars" #10 will be available Oct. 9.



Note: The following blog entry contains SPOILERS to “Star Wars #8

In “Star Wars” #8 we finally get more than just a handful of panels dealing with the subplot of Han Solo on the run from Boba Fett and Bossk. The chase began in issue #2 and we’ve been building to a hopeful conflict – which writer Brian Wood delivers in this action packed issue.

While Luke Skywalker and Wedge sneak aboard a Star Destroyer, the real action takes place on Coruscant. We are treated to a massive dogfight, that highlights the cunning evasive skills of Chewbacca and Han Solo – as well as showcases the hunting skills of Boba Fett.

When we last left Han Solo and Chewbacca, they had hired garbage-barge pilot, Perla, to aid them in an escape from bounty hunters Boba Fett and Bossk, who tracked them to Coruscant. The smugglers are forced to split up as Slave I engages them – navigating the Falcon as Han Solo and Perla remain aboard the barge.

The tactic worked, as Boba Fett hadn’t planned on a firefight above the Imperial Center. With Chewbacca’s counterattacks on the Slave I, Fett is forced to allow the Garbage-barge to gain distance – the risk of killing Solo in the dogfight is too high, and he attends to capture him alive to collect on the dual bounty, one from the Hutt Cartel and the other the Empire.

Han Solo tells Perla he is surprised to see the bounty hunter in an Imperial Jurisdiction. Unfortunately for Perla and Solo, the space battle put them on the Imperial security radar, blowing their cover in the process. Once catching up, the Slave I continue to attack the garbage-barge, but aims for its cargo, resulting in Perla to lose large portions of her cargo and jeopardizing their ability to maneuver.

Meanwhile, Bossk chases down Chewbacca in the Falcon. The bounty is on Solo’s head, so Bossk is intent on destroying both, the Falcon and Chewbacca.

Han Solo crashes the barge into the Imperial Center. He believes it’s a calculated risk, which will payoff in their escape, but the plan comes up short as Slave I hones in one the smuggler and Perla, with them outgunned and without a ship on the ground floor of the Imperial Center.

There are several items of note in this issue: first, Wood emphasizes that it’s unusual for Boba Fett to engage his prey in Imperial borders. This must be foreshadowing for the next issue, why are these areas off limits to Boba Fett? Could his saving grace be Imperial Security Forces stepping in right as Slave I closes in on the marooned Perla and Solo?

Ryan Kelly’s art goes above and beyond in this issue. The most haunting image, in my opinion, are the skulls and bodily remains decorating Bossk’s cockpit seat.

We’ve still yet to be told how Boba Fett and Bossk became a team in this issue. Or are they building on the rebooted relationship between the two, which has already been expanded upon in The Clone Wars?

The confrontation will continue in “Star Wars” #9 will be released on Sept. 11

Note: The following contains SPOILERS to Star Wars #7

Over the past months, Dark Horse has delivered an Original Trilogy story arc that has been praised for its ability to capture the tone and dynamic of classic Star Wars. There’s a long list of reasons this is an asset, it is nostalgic and takes readers back to simpler times.

Writer Brian Woods, though, has continued another classic Star Wars trope, which I feel is a negative element –giving Boba Fett only a few panels every few issues. When reading “Star Wars: In The Shadows of Yavin,” the Boba Fett subplot has been a near duplicate of what we see in “Star Wars: Dark Empire.”

When Slave I appeared in Star Wars #2, I wrote in a preview piece that I hoped Dark Horse would break away from the cat-and-mouse story we’ve seen a continuously between Boba Fett and Han Solo. Instead, the cameo lasted a mere few story boxes before Solo makes an escape.

We catch back up with Han Solo a few issues later on Coruscant. Boba Fett tracks him to the seedy underworld, and we learn he’s partnered with Bossk to claim the Imperial bounty. Han Solo once again slips away with the help of an aspiring smuggler, Perla.

In Star Wars #7, Perla’s transport comes under attack by Slave 1 and Hound’s Tooth. The bounty hunters have flanked their prey, and it’s teased that Han Solo, Chewbacca and their new “friend” will have to blast their way out. The entire story arc feels like déjà vu – replace Bossk with Dengar and the story hits most of the plot points in “Dark Empire.”

The focus of this comic centers around the Rebellion, and on that note, the story has been excellent. However, Woods has been slow roasting Solo/Fett’s subplot, which I can only hope we’ll be awarded for our patients with a well deserved space battle and firefight in Star Wars #8.

Specifically, I’d like to see some actual interaction between Boba Fett and Bossk. I’d like to see whether Woods builds on the relationship we see between the two in The Clone Wars or if it’s more of a shaky alliance that existed prior to the retconned partnership – more akin to their interactions in early bounty hunter novels.

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WIN FOUR TRADING CARDS FOR YOUR COLLECTION…

The Boba Bounty announces its first Giveaway in celebration of reaching 50 followers on Twitter. This weekend, a random follower will be chosen to receive four free trading cards from Star Wars Galactic Files.

These cards include bounty hunters Bossk, Zuckuss and Durge, and Death Watch leader Pre Vizsla. To be eligible, just follow us at twitter.com/thebobabounty by Friday night at midnight.

If you’d like to help promote this giveaway, tweet who your favorite bounty hunter or Mandalorian is and why, followed by hashtag #bobabountygiveaway.

The random follower will be direct messaged, where we can obtain a mailing address to send the cards. The winner will have three days to accept the giveaway offer, or a runner-up will be chosen.

Thank you all for the continued support and readership! We’ll plan bigger giveaways each time we hit a milestone.

Today it was officially announced Disney already has plans for a number of standalone Star Wars films. Many fans are hoping a Boba Fett film will be among these projects. Here is a continuation of possible storylines for a feature film.

Pitch #3: Years after the happenings of “Return of the Jedi,” the nephew of Jabba, Gorga the Hutt, has inherited much of the crime lord’s criminal empire. He has even expanded the reach of his power. Of course, one does not gain such a fortune without making enemies – other Hutts, who believe they have a greater claim to Jabba’s windfall. One such Hutt hires Boba Fett to assassinate Gorga’s beloved wife, Orko. Filled with rage, Gorga places a bounty on Boba Fett’s head – using his control over local pirates and bounty hunters on his payroll to corner the Mandalorian. Boba Fett must go on the defense as he finds himself as the most profitable target since Han Solo. The bounty is so enticing, Boba finds himself pitted against former partners, the most dangerous being the bounty hunter named, Bossk. This story would journey through the underworld, giving rich looks at the world of the Hutts, the nastiest cantinas and pirate organizations in live action.

Pitch #4: Following the Clone Wars, the planet of Mandalore was virtually crippled. Once the Empire formed, it was further squashed as its warriors were considered a great threat if given opportunity. However, this would change with the arrival of Spar, a clone who had escaped Kamino before the wars and was one of the rare specimens who retained all memories of Jango Fett. He had been working as a bounty hunter for years, but returned to Mandalore to return the planet to its former glory. His success in reforming a Mandalorian army caught the eye of Imperial spies who feel they must end the threat before it grows too large to contain. The Empire hires Boba Fett to journey to Mandalore and infiltrate the new Mandalore Protectors, gain their trust, learn their plans and then kill Spar and anyone else who may pick up arms. Things become complicated, though, for the bounty hunter, who begins to see too much of the father he lost in the man he’s assigned to kill.

This 16-oz plastic cup features the images of bounty hunters Bossk, IG-88, Jango Fett, Boba Fett and Zam Wesell. These cups go for under a buck each and are great for birthday parties and other celebrations. It’s interesting to find Wesell, a lesser known character on a product like this.